Dance Therapy Association of Australia

Fran Ostroburski

Fran Ostroburski – Bio


Edition:

Fran, Prof. Member DTAA, B.A.(Mon) Dip.Soc.Studs (Melb) Dip. Dance-Movt Therapy (IDTIA) AYTTC (yoga) is a trained social worker and dance therapist. She teaches creative dance for adults and pre-natal yoga at Mangala Studios. She has worked as a dance therapist at Connections, Uniting Care with disadvantaged families for 20 years specializing in primary treatment with children. She facilitates a group with the frail elderly at Munzer community residence and is in private practice.
Fran teaches in the IDTIA Certificate Training Course and supervises students in the Advanced Diploma Course. She also teaches in the Mangala Studios Teaching Creative Dance Diploma Course. Fran works in the Melbourne metro region, and can offer supervision and student placements.
Mob: 0409 213 640 / Email: frandance@bigpond.com

Fran Ostraburski – Bio


Edition:

Prof. Member DTAA, B.A.(Mon) Dip.Soc.Studs (Melb) Dip. dance-movt therapy (IDTIA) AYTTC (yoga). Ostraburski is a trained social worker and dance therapist. She teaches creative dance for adults and pre-natal yoga at Mangala Studios. She has worked as a dance therapist at Connections, Uniting Care with disadvantaged families for 20 years specializing in primary treatment with children. She facilitates a group with the frail elderly at Munzer community residence and is in private practice.

Ostraburski teaches in the IDTIA certificate training course and supervises students in the advanced diploma course. She also teaches in the Mangala Studios creative dance diploma course.

Dance Therapy for the Socially Disadvantaged Parent and Child


Edition: Dance Therapy Collections 2

Keywords: Dance Therapy, social disadvantage, parent-child, object relations theory, Winnicott, transitional objects, imaginative living, music, metaphor, imagery

Page #: 43

This paper discusses the development of the dance therapy program at Canterbury Family Centre, where there has been a shift from creative dance focus with children and caregivers to dance/movement therapy with children and parents. A creative model using music, objects and design is underpinned by an object relations theory framework, particularly D.W. Winnicott’s concepts of imaginative living, the area between internal and external reality and the use of transitional objects.

A Dancer’s Journey


Edition: Dance Therapy Collections 1

Keywords: creative dance, Marion Woodman, ego, personal account

Page #: 20

The author shares her personal journey of discovery through creative dance. Interwoven with this story are several ‘exquisite’ passages from Marion Woodman’s book: The Owl was a Baker’s Daughter, which inspired the writing of the article.

The Internal Dance


Edition: Dance Therapy Collections 1

Keywords: creative dance, pre-natal, mother-child relationship, yoga, massage, relaxation, self-awareness

Page #: 10

In this article, Ostraburski describes her classes for expectant mothers in which ‘the mother and developing baby are offered an early opportunity to make an internal journey of discovery. This is both a creative and therapeutic experience.’ Fran describes the phases of pregnancy and approaches she has taken in providing a program designed to be fulfilling within physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual realms. Strategies described include selection of music, choice of aesthetics and techniques such as massage and yoga.

Dance Movement Psychotherapy as Primary Treatment


Edition: Dance Therapy Collections 3

Keywords
attachment, dance-movement therapy, mother-toddler dyad, trusting

Page #: 151

This case study is about the development of a trusting attachment between a dance therapist and a mother- toddler dyad. The child, Chloe*, was referred to dance movement therapy following the death of her four year old sister, Bea*, in a car accident. Chloe’s normal development, in particular her language skills, deteriorated. It was the mother’s diagnosis that her relationship to the child was profoundly interrupted by grief. Although the mother attended to her basic needs, she was emotionally unavailable to Chloe. The development of a deep secure attachment between the therapist and the dyad contributed to their facing, enduring and healing the grief. Chloe’s language skills developed over two years and she was able to speak about the trauma.

ADTA Conference Reflections


Edition: 2007 Vol. 6 Nos. 3-4

Keywords
embodying research, dementia, neuroscience, children, movement choir, private practice

Fran shares her “An Australian Experience, Dance/Movement Therapy: New Currents, New Bridges The 42nd Annual Conference, of the American Dance Therapy Association”. This was sparked by the catalyst to have the honour to hear Dr. Marcia Leventhal speak at the Marion Chase Lecture titled “Transformation and Healing through Dance Therapy: the Challenge and Imperative of Holding the Vision”. A wide array of presentations are reflected upon, with snippets from each, as Fran offers encouraging inspiration and community connection to Australian DMTs. (pp 22-23)